With everybody and thier grandma lowering their car, I have seen quite a few bowlegged cars on the road. For a daily driver, this not only looks sad...it actually affects performance and will wear out your tires. If, after lowering your car, the alignment shop says that your car does not have enough adjustment to fix the camber...you need to install some camber kits. Most likely, you will need front and rear kits. In addition to fixing the alignment for daily driving, these kits allow you to dial in more negative camber for track days. These kits are also very easy to install, so you could actually finish front and rear in about an hour if you hustle.

Items to gather before you start:
- jack and jack stands
- blocks for front wheels
- lug wrench
- torque wrench
- ratchets
- 14mm socket
- 10mm deep socket
- ball joint seperator
- breaker bar and liquid wrench (optional)


Before you start, go ahead and loosen the lugnuts on all four wheels...if you are doing both front and rear kits. And a reminder, you should never work under a car supported by only a jack...always use jack stands. You should also disconnect the negative battery terminal.


Front Camber Arms
After you have loosened the lugnuts, raised up the car, supported it on jackstands, and removed the front wheels...you will be able to see the stock upper arm that we are going to be replacing.
 
The first step is to remove the cotter pin, and then remove the 17mm castle nut from the balljoint.
 
Next you need to seperate the balljoint from the knuckle. You can use a fork type ball joint tool, or a small pitman arm tool. I chose the second option, and it worked great. Make sure you thread a nut on the end of the balljoint stud, just a few threads, before putting a puller type tool to it...or you might mushroom the stud....and the balljoint will be ruined if you ever want to use the stock parts again.
 
In order to get the rear bolts out on the passenger side, you need to remove the battery and the stock airbox to gain access to them. After disconnecting the negative and positive battery terminals (negative first) you will need to remove the 10mm nuts for the battery hold down so you can remove it...then just lift out the battery and set it aside. Next, if you still have the stock airbox, you will need to remove the two 10mm bolts shown and also disconnect the intake tube from the box, then lift the airbox out and set it aside as well.
 
Now you can get to the two 14mm bolts to remove them.
 
On the driver side, this bolt is easy enough to get to in order to remove it.
 
But on this side you have a hose in the way. See that clip the hose goes through? Just lift it out, and reposition it to give you more room to work.
 
Like so...now you can get to the bolt to get it out.
 
OK, now that we know how to get all those bolts out, lets get back to work. Make sure you clean any grease off of the knuckle where the balljoint will seat.
 
Then put your arm in and tighten the rear bolts finger tight.

(DO NOT TORQUE THEM YET)
 
Now lower the balljoint through the knuckle, and install the castle nut. Torque the castle nut down to 29 lbf-ft, and then tighten it until you can get your new cotter pin through and install that. (cotter pin is not shown...but MUST be installed)
 
After you get the arm in, and the castlenut torqued down, reinstall your wheel with the lugnuts finger tight. Lower your car off of the jack stands, and torque the lugnuts to 80 lbf-ft. Now go back and torque the rear bolts on each side to 40 lbf-ft and reinstall your battery and the airbox, and put that hose back as it was. The next step is to either go get an alignment, or get the rear installed.
 
 
Rear Camber Arms
After you have loosened the lugnuts, raised up the car, supported it on jackstands, and removed the rear wheels...you will be able to see the stock upper arm that we are going to be replacing.
 
Now you will need to remove all three of these bolts to get the stock arm out. A breaker bar can help here if they are being stuborn.
 
With the stock arm out you can see that our new camber adjustable arm is a bit longer than the stock one at this point.
 
To get a baseline, adjust the new camber adjustable arm to about the same length as the stock arm.
 
Now it is time to install the new camber adjustable arm. Install the two rear bolts first, finger tight, and then go ahead and work the front one in. You will probably have to muscle the rear trailing arm around a bit to get the bolt in. After you have it in, get that one finger tight, then go and torque the rear bolts to 29 lbf-ft, and the front bolt to 40 lbf-ft.
 
After you get the arm in, and torqued down, reinstall your wheel with the lugnuts finger tight. Lower your car off of the jack stands, and torque the lugnuts to 80 lbf-ft. The next step is either to go get an alignment, or install the front.





Site Design By George Belton And Best Viewed With Mozilla Firefox at 1024x768. Feedback/Comments